Our gallery has been updated with some great portrait sessions of Emily taken as SXSW Festival during her promotion of A Quiet Place. Enjoy!

Labels: A Quiet Place, Festivals, Photo Updates, Photoshoots, Projects

Yesterday was the “world” premiere of Emily’s latest film, A Quiet Place – directed by husband John Krasinski at the SXSW Festival in Austin, Texas. Early reviews since the screening have been very positive, so here’s to hoping that the film will be commercially successful, too. I’ve added a handful of photos of the couple at the premiere to the gallery.

Labels: A Quiet Place, Appearances, Festivals, Photo Updates, Projects

Last night marked the premiere of A Quiet Place at SXSW Film Festial in Austin, Texas (photos to follow soon) – and the film was met with great reactions from both critics and audiences. So happy for John, and for Emily! Horror films can often get ripped by critics, so it’s nice to see some of the industry’s most prestigious publications give positive reviews. You can read the full reviews by clicking the title links below.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER – A terrifying thriller with a surprisingly warm heart, John Krasinski’s A Quiet Place is a monster-movie allegory for parenting in a world gone very, very wrong. A couple with kids in real life, Krasinski and Emily Blunt here play parents in a world where even the slightest noise can lead to sudden, violent death: Training their children to be self-sufficient without making a sound is as unique a challenge as, well, let’s not waste the time explaining what in 2018 America might feel like a plague of revolting, apocalypse-creating monsters, because even moviegoers who don’t accept the metaphor are going to have the pants scared off them. Third time’s the charm for Krasinski in the director’s chair, as commercial success is all but guaranteed.

VARIETY – Krasinski, whose personality in the features he has directed (“The Hollars,” “Brief Interviews with Hideous Men”) has always seemed a bit blurry, now brings himself into focus with the genre brinksmanship of “A Quiet Place.” He stages highly suspenseful scenes, like one involving Emily Blunt and a nail sticking out of the basement stairs, and another in a grain elevator. In the second half, the film turns into a more conventional alien-attack thriller, but if anything it becomes more rousingly effective. The monsters, it turns out, can hear everything but see nothing. And though we can’t always buy what we’re seeing in “A Quiet Place,” Krasinski is a gifted enough filmmaker to paper over our objections. He directs with all his senses.

INDIEWIRE – “A Quiet Place” develops its horrifying premise around a gimmick perfect for cinematic storytelling — in a post-apocalyptic countryside, monsters are drawn to their prey by sound, so human survivors can barely exchange more than whispers. Directed with first-rate visual flair by John Krasinski (who knew?), this riveting near-silent thriller exudes the despair of a broken world with the concision of a Cormac McCarthy novel folded into a simplistic B-movie premise. Utilizing the pure physicality of a cast you can count on one hand, the movie maintains a minimalist dread throughout, with every footstep or sudden move carrying the potential for instant death.

Labels: A Quiet Place, Festivals, Projects