Earlier today, Disney released our very first look at Emily as the title character in Mary Poppins Returns–very exciting! You can view the full size image by clicking the preview photo below.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY – She’s practically perfect from every angle.

Disney has just released a dazzling first look at Mary Poppins Returns, the forthcoming sequel in which the titular nanny is played by the correspondingly magical Emily Blunt. The original follow-up to the cherished 1964 musical will arrive in theaters Dec. 25, 2018.

In this new image, we get just a taste of all the trappings that will help transform Blunt into the legendary caretaker — namely, a stunning peacock-cobalt ruffled coat and a deep rich bird-adorned pink hat, both instantly parallel to but distinctive from what Julie Andrews donned in 1964. Mary Poppins’ boundless carpet bag, on the other hand, has received a complete makeover (though the jury is out on whether its endless contents have changed).

What’s more is that Mary looks to be right back on the edge of Cherry Tree Lane, the famed street where the stern but whimsical nanny first flew into the Banks family’s life years prior — 20, to be practically precise.

Mary Poppins Returns picks up two-and-change decades after the events of the 1964 film, furthering the adventures of Mary Poppins and the Banks children, Jane and Michael, who have long since grown up (they’re played in the film by Emily Mortimer and Ben Whishaw) but are no less in need of their former minder. The new tale, as penned by screenwriter David Magee, is set in Depression-era London and finds Mary Poppins returning to help the family rediscover joy after Michael suffers a personal loss.

The film pulls from stories within the other seven books of P.L. Travers’ original children’s series. As the Banks children grew, so did their travels with Mary Poppins, who popped in and out of their lives throughout the additional novels along with several other ephemeral characters that will now finally find their way onscreen (like recently-announced Angela Lansbury, who plays a maniacal balloon vendor).

In addition to Blunt, the principal cast also includes Lin-Manuel Miranda as a musical lamplighter named Jack, Meryl Streep as Mary’s cousin Topsy, Colin Firth as banker William Weatherall Wilkins, Julie Walters as loyal housekeeper Ellen, and a trio of newcomers filling the roles of Michael Banks’ children. Original star Dick Van Dyke will also make a featured appearance in the sequel.

Mary Poppins Returns reunites Blunt with director Rob Marshall, who most recently oversaw both Blunt and Streep in Disney’s film adaptation of Into the Woods in 2014. Marshall has enlisted Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman to compose new music for the film, which will be produced by the director, his partner John DeLuca, and film/stage producer (recently and notably, of La La Land) Marc Platt.

Labels: Mary Poppins Returns, Photo Updates, Projects

Emily and husband John Krasinski are currently attending the EE British Academy Film Awards in London, where she was nominated for her role in The Girl on the Train. I’ve updated the gallery with our first batch of high-quality photos of the gorgeous couple from the red carpet.

Labels: Appearances, Photo Updates

I’ve updated the gallery with our first batch of photos of Emily and husband John Krasinksi attending the 23rd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards in Los Angeles. Emily is nominated tonight for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role for her amazing work in The Girl on the Train. Be sure to check back later for further coverage from the event.

Labels: Appearances, Photo Updates

I’ve updated the gallery with screen captures from the Blu-ray edition of The Girl on the Train–including special features from the disc. Emily gives a powerhouse performance as Rachel Watson, a woman struggling to overcome an her addiction and inner demons that stem from her divorce and inability to fall pregnant. Her life becomes even more complicated when she finds herself at the center of a murder investigation. The film itself is flawed, yet still enjoyable, and it’s a shame that her work has been largely overlooked during awards season due to the mixed critical response towards the film. I hope you enjoy the screen captures, and just a warning for those that haven’t watched yet, they do contain spoilers.


Labels: Movies, Photo Updates, Projects, The Girl on the Train

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS – They threw the book at her.

By the time Emily Blunt agreed to a role in “The Girl on the Train,” the thriller by Paula Hawkins had already reached a full head of steam. It’s already sold 15 million copies worldwide in its first 19 months.

“I noticed everybody reading this book before I did,” Blunt told the Daily News. “I feel like I saw this title everywhere and it was on every subway, every plane I went on. We would go on holidays and you’d see people’s faces just buried into a copy of ‘The Girl on the Train.’”

And that meant all of those eyeballs would be glaring at any film adaptation of a novel that has drawn heady comparisons to both “Rear Window” and “Gone Girl.” That scrutiny would fall particularly hard on Blunt if she couldn’t properly play a perpetually drunk heroine, without stumbling into unintentional slapstick.

“That was my concern,” Blunt said. “I think there are pitfalls with it; that you can appear comical, lurching around like a drunk uncle. I think she needed to be frightening. It’s a very real disease and its claws are in her.”

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Labels: Articles and Interviews, Photo Updates, Photoshoots

I’ve updated the gallery with some newly released stills and a behind the scenes photo from The Girl on the Train–all of which are available to view in high-resolution. Enjoy!

Labels: Photo Updates, Projects, The Girl on the Train

TIME – Emily Blunt has come a long way from her star-making turn as a Louboutin-loving fashionista in 2006’s The Devil Wears Prada. To play the lead role in The Girl on the Train, out Oct. 7, she had to deglamorize like never before. “Talk about no makeup,” she says over salmon teriyaki and iced green tea at a Brooklyn sushi joint on a late-summer evening. “We added makeup to make me look even more like I had no makeup.” Each day she was decorated with prosthetic under-eye bags, varicose veins and rosacea, along with a changing array of contact lenses meant to evoke various stages of inebriation: pinkish for buzzed, bloodshot for hammered, tinged with yellow for brutally hung over.

Yet for all the attention on the minutiae of her appearance, the key to playing such a truly damaged character—a divorced, infertile alcoholic obsessed with the perfect-looking lives of a couple she whizzes past on her daily commute—lay far beneath the bleary-eyed surface. To bring Rachel Watson to life, Blunt, 33, had to learn how to identify with the humiliation and isolation familiar to many addicts. She disappeared so thoroughly into the character that even her husband, actor and director John Krasinski, says he didn’t recognize her onscreen. “For the first time ever,” he says, “I forgot it was my wife.”

High praise as that may be, Blunt will need to impress legions of tougher critics: the millions of readers who buoyed the movie’s inspiration, Paula Hawkins’ 2015 novel of the same name, to the No. 1 spot on the New York Times best-seller list for 13 weeks straight. While the book is the kind of impossible-to-put-down Hitchcockian psychodrama that begs for a film adaptation, its success creates a daunting bar for the movie to clear. “That’s what I found so appealing,” says Blunt. “It’s less about the thriller of whodunit. It’s the idea of your blackout drunk protagonist making sure she didn’t do it.”

The novel weaves together the perspectives of three interconnected women. There’s Rachel, who rides the commuter train from suburban Westchester into New York City. (The movie transplants the story from the book’s London setting to the U.S., though Blunt keeps her accent in tribute to Hawkins’ story.) Then there’s Megan (Haley Bennett), whose house Rachel’s train passes each day and who, Rachel imagines, has a perfect marriage. And finally there’s Anna (Rebecca Ferguson), the real estate agent whom Rachel’s husband (Justin Theroux) left her for. When Megan goes missing, Rachel believes she can help solve the mystery— though she can’t be sure that she didn’t, during a blackout, have something to do with Megan’s disappearance.

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Labels: Articles and Interviews, Photo Updates, Photoshoots, Projects, The Girl on the Train
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